Every Bottle of Perfume Contains a World

An olfactory map of perfumes and flavors

from all over the world built through the faces, the hands and the work of people that grow extraordinary raw materials which create precious essences. An exhibition curated by Chandler Burr

Comorres

YLANG EXTRA OIL LMR
Cananga odorata (Lam.) Hook. f. & Thomson

Ylang trees bloom all year long, but they produce more flowers during the dry season, from April to September. These flowers are picked early in the morning and distilled. The distillation lasts about 20 hours: as the oil comes into the receiver, it is separated into several fractions of about 30 grams, which are set aside separately. The first fractions have the highest density: it’s ylang extra. The 2nd tier is called Ylang premiere, followed by ylang IInd and IIIrd. 
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Ivory Coast

GINGER OIL LMR
Zingiber officinale Roscoe

While dry ginger is widely used for perfumery, LMR uses fresh ginger, to obtain that fresh, wet smell of just cut ginger. 
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Egypt

GERANIUM OIL LMR
Pelargonium graveolens L’Her.
 
JASMIN ABS LMR
Jasminum grandiflorum L.
 
In Egypt, the Jasmine is picked very early in the morning, before the heat becomes stifling. Women do most of the picking, and go from path to path, with a very precise gesture to avoid damaging the flowers. They store them in wicker baskets, which are brought to the plant to be extracted as they pick. 
 

TAGETE OIL LMR
Tagetes minuta L.


Tagete is a small plant, which is replanted every year. One waits for the flower to bloom. When it does, the plant is cut off and everything is used for distillation.
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Ethiopia

MYRRH RESOID MD LMR
Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl.

In Ethiopia, the tradition of incense and myrrh collection has existed for thousands of years. The trees grow in desert  areas, and nomadic tribes stop by them and make an incision. From this wound inflicted on the tree, oozes a sap. One or two weeks after the incision, the nomads collect the gum which will have solidified on the trunk.
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Madagascar

VANILLA BEAN LMR
Vanilla planifolia Jacks

To obtain vanilla pods, the vanilla flowers are first pollinized manually from August to September. The pod then develops in the next 10 to 12 months. In June-July of the fllowing year, it is ready to be picked, while still green. It is immediately boiled for 3 or 4 minutes, then cured: it’s left to bake in the sun 4 to 6 hours per day, then wrapped during the night in warm blankets to continue the baking. This allows the vanillin precursors to develop. After 3 months, it’s ready to be extracted when it reaches a humidity level of 22-23% and is completely stable vanillin rate of 1,8/uv minimum. 

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Morocco

CEDARWOOD OIL LMR
Cedrus atlantica


Cedarwood oil comes from the woodwork or cabinetmaking industries. Indeed, these industries use the wood itself, and discard a lot of wood shavings, which are wasted if not used. LMR uses those shavings and distills them to obtain cedarwood oil. 
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Tunisia

NEROLI OIL LMR & ORANGE FLOWERS ABS LMR
Citrus aurantium L.

The orange tree, citrus aurentium, is particularly generous : all of its parts can be used for different purposes, from the twigs and leaves, to the flower, and the fruits. Orange flower is harvested during 3 short weeks, in the spring: women very quickly and delicately pick the flowers, which are brought to the plant. Like the brother, orange flowers can be either distilled: it’s the neroli oil; or extracted: it’s the orange flower absolute. 

PETITGRAIN BIGDE OIL LMR
Citrus aurantium L.
 
Bitter orange trees are particularly generous trees: almost all of the parts of the tree can be used for different purposes. While its fruits are used for both food and for the beautifully sparkling orange oil, its flowers are extracted or distilled for the neroli oil or orange flower absolute; and its twigs and leaves are either distilled or extracted, for orange leaf absolute or petitgrain oil, a floral, bitter, green neroli note.
 

AMERICA

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Brazil

TONKA BEAN ABS LMR
Dipteryx odorata


The leguminous seed of the Tonka tree Dipteryx odorata, a large rainforest tree (growing to more than 120 feet high) native to South America and belonging to the pea family--have sometimes been used as a substitute for vanilla. Tonka beans have an incredibly sweet fragrance and flavor which is reminiscent of vanilla, almonds, cinnamon and cloves.
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Guatemala

CARDAMOM OIL LMR
Elettaria cardamomum Maton

Cardamom is a spice widely used in the South American. To produce the oil, one used the seeds contained inside the pods.
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Haiti

VETIVER OIL LMR
Vetiveria zizanoides L.

Vetiver is manually collected, or with an ox-pulled cart. Farmers pull the roots from the ground, and dry it first, to let the soil around the roots disintegrate. Vetiver roots must spend at least 2 years underground before they can be pulled out. 
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USA

CEDARWOOD HEART LMR
Juniperus mexicana Schiede


China

MAGNOLIA OIL LMR
Michelia x alba DC. (syn. Michelia longifolia Blume)


Magnolia grows in the Guilin region, in China. The flowers are hand-picked when they reach maturity, before they open up. The main market is tea: flowers are dried, and used to flavor local tea. LMR carefully selects its magnolia flowers, choosing beautiful qualities which are not mixed with leaves. 

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India

JASMIN SAMBAC ABS LMR
Jasminum sambac (L.) Aiton

Sambac Jasmine grows in India, where it is mostly and widely used for religious rituals and ceremonial necklaces. Perfumery only uses a tiny proportion of the total production of Indian jasmine! LMR extracts a beautifully fresh quality, strongly reminiscent of the smell of the flower in the field. 
 

 

TUBEROSE ABS LMR
Polianthes tuberosa L.

Just like Sambac Jasmine, these beautiful small fragrance flowers are used mostly for ceremonial necklaces in India. Flowers are picked while still a bud, very early in the morning, since necklaces can only be made with the buds. Once picked, they are brought to the plant, and are aerated to avoid fermentation, while the flower is left to bloom before extraction. 
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Indonesia

PATCHOULI OIL LMR
Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth

In Sumatra, there is a very traditional nomadic tradition of patchouli culture. Farmers clear a surface in the forests, and burn waste which will be used as a natural manure. They leave the ground to rest for 2 months, and come back to plant the plantlets, which are shielded from the sun in the beginning. They are then left to grow without any interaction for a couple of years. Farmers then come back, and pick the planted patchouli. They distill on the spot, in portable stills which can be completely dismantled in 30 minutes. 

France

BLACKCURRANT BUDS ABS LMR
Ribes nigrum L.

Blackcurrant bud is harvested in Burgundy in the winter, after the appearance of the first frosts. Harvesting machines, developed by LMR, and inspired by cereals harvesters, cut the branches, and immediately cut out the buds from the branches.

CLARY SAGE OIL LMR
Salvia sclarea L.


Clary sage is harvested in July, when the summer heat is at its peak. Farmers wait for droplets to appear on the stem of the plant. These droplets show that the plant has reached maturity and can be harvested. They are then cut off, and left in the heat for 2 or 3 days. The heat develops the precursors of the essential oil, which starts to ooze from the stem. This is when beautiful, ambery notes start developing. 

MIMOSA ABS LMR
Acacia dealbata Link.


Mimosa is one of the only flowers to bloom in the middle of the winter. Comes February, the South of France is constellated with those radiant yellow explosions. The perfumery variety is not cultivated; it grows in the wild in natural parks. 

NARCISSE ABS LMR
Narcissus poeticus L.

LMR is the only supplier of narcisse absolute for perfumery. This beautiful innocent looking flower grows in the wild, in the plateau of Lozère. It used to be harvested manually, with a comb to delicately lift the flowers. Today, we use a mechanical harvesting machine to sustainability harvest the flower. 
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Italy

MANDARIN OIL MD LMR
Citrus reticulata
 
There are 3 different kinds of mandarin from Italy: the green, yellow, and red one. Colors correspond to the different degrees of maturity of the fruit. LMR uses the red mandarin, which is juicier and less tangy than the two others. The essential oil is found in the external, colored surface of the fruit peel. 

ORRIS ABS LMR
Iris pallida Lam.
 
Orris is one of the most expensive materials in perfumery, selling for over 100.000€/kg of absolute. The precious rhizomes which are used in perfumery (not the flowers) need to spend at least 3 years underground, before they can be dug out. They are then placed to age in caves, very similar to wines or cigar, for another couple of years to develop the precursors responsible for their beautiful, rich aroma.
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Russia

CORIANDER OIL LMR
Coriandrum sativum L.

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Spain

CISTE ABS LMR
Cistus ladaniferus L.

Ciste grows in the wild and is not cultivated. Its leaves are very thin and delicate, and its flower blooms in the spring. In the summer heat, the plant has adopted a strategy to avoid the evaporation of its essential oil: it develops a resin which coats the outer layer of the plant, and which keeps its moisture. In the summer, it develops a large quantity of this resin. If the plant is distilled, we obtain ciste oil. Labdanum is obtained by detaching the resin from the plan, and extracting that resin. 

LAVENDER OIL MT LMR
Lavandula angustifolia Mill.

LMR carefully selects the most floral lavender oils, harvested in the middle of the summer in Provence, in the South of France. 

IMMORTELLE ABS LMR
Helichrysum italicum (Roth) G.Don

Immortelles grow in the sands and dunes, in warm climates. It is a wild plant, which forms a bush. In the summer, the flower dries up, and the complete bush is harvested to be extracted. 
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Turkey

ROSE OIL LMR
Rosa x damascena Mill.

Turkish Damascena Rose is the queen of perfumery flowers. Harvested in May, in the Isparta region, it is cultivated by hundreds of families of farmers, who patiently pick, one by one, the delicate flowers, and bring them to the plant to be distilled for the Rose Oil, or extracted to produce a Rose Absolute. 

OCEANIA

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Australia

SANDALWOOD ALBUM OIL
Santalum album L.

Indian sandalwood is an ingredient used since thousands of years, for religious or beauty rituals, in India and all over the world. The extensive use of the ingredient has unfortunately led to a depletion of the Indian sandalwood forest, which is now seriously endangered. LMR had partnered with TFS, an Australian company, which has planted millions of Indian Sandalwood trees in Australia, to propose a sustainable alternative for this beautiful product. Today, this Sandalwood Album from Australia is grown, harvested, and extracted sustainably in Australia.
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An exhibition curated by Chandler Burr  
Raw materials kindly provided by IFF- International Flavors 
Installation design Alessandro Moradei with Elena Mari