Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana presents

Firenze Hometown of Fashion

Events
The story of the celebrations for the 60th anniversary of the Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana
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SPECIAL CONTENT ON THE PROJECTS
Contenuti extra di approfondimento
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The film of Firenze Hometown of Fashion.
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I costumi della Sartoria Tirelli

I costumi della Sartoria Tirelli | Foyer dell'Opera di Firenze | 16.06.2014 |

PHOTO ALBUM RED CARPET

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Andrea Bocelli

Andrea Bocelli | Opera di Firenze | 16.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

PHOTO ALBUM RED CARPET

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Luci ed Emozioni

Luci ed Emozioni |  Ponte Vecchio | 16.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

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Inaugurazione Pitti Immagine Uomo 86 and
BOF - The Business of Fashion award

Digital menswear hub by BOF | Salone dei Cinquecento Palazzo Vecchio | 17.06.2014


PHOTO ALBUM

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Born in Florence

Design a dream by Emilio Pucci | Battistero di San Giovanni | 17.06.2014

MORE INFO 


Museo Gucci | Piazza della Signoria | 17.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM


Richard Ginori - Gucci | Via dei Rondinelli | 18.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM


Equilibrium | Museo Salvatore Ferragamo | 18.06.2014

PROJECT ROOM


The white renaissance by Ermanno Scervino | Forte Belvedere | 18.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

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Florence and fashion

Florence and fashion | Sala d'Arme di Palazzo Vecchio | 17.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

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Vezzoli primavera-estate

Casa Museo Martelli | 17.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM
OPENING PHOTO ALBUM

Museo Bardini | 17.06.2014

 

PHOTO ALBUM

OPENING PHOTO ALBUM

Museo Bellini | 17.06.2014

 

PHOTO ALBUM

OPENING PHOTO ALBUM

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Le Italie della Moda. Menti e mani eccellenti

Le Italie della Moda. Menti e mani eccellenti | Palazzo Gondi | 17.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

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La Notte dei Modivori

La Notte dei Modivori | Cinema Teatro Odeon | 17.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

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Pitti Italics

County of Milan Marcelo Burlon

County of Milan Marcelo Burlon | Parterre di Piazza della Libertà | 19.06.2014

 

PHOTO ALBUM

au jour le jour

au jour le jour | Dogana | 19.06.2014

 

PHOTO ALBUM
WELCOME PHOTO ALBUM

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E poi c'è Napoli

E poi c'è Napoli | Cinema Teatro Odeon | 19.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

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Il design automobilistico Italiano degli anni '50 e '60

Il design automobilistico italiano degli anni '50 e '60 | Piazza della Signoria | 17.06.2014

PHOTO ALBUM

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Firenze. Fashion Atlas

Firenze. Fashion Atlas | Palazzo Vecchio | 17.06.2014

PROJECT ROOM

FHOF
Firenze Hometown Of Fashion

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Made in Italy fashion, the international success, was born in Florence at the beginning of the 1950s. Ever since then, Florence has made its planning, organizational, cultural and financial resources available for promoting Italian fashions throughout the world. 
This year the Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana is celebrating its 60th anniversary and therefore, on the occasion of Pitti Immagine Uomo 86 (17-20 June 2014), will launch a program of special events produced in cooperation with Pitti Immagine and with special grants from the Italian Ministry for Economic Development and ICE. The network created for this occasion is a model of integrated strategies among public and private institutions – those that work in the interests of the system – that is destined to become a reference point for all policies supporting Italian fashion and for those whose duty is to promote the fashion industry.

A project by

Produced with a special grant from the

Ice - Agenzia per la promozione estera e l’internazionalizzazione delle imprese italiane

www.ice.gov.it

In cooperation with

SPECIAL CONTENT ON THE PROJECTS

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Welcome in Florence for Firenze Hometown of Fashion by
Stefano Ricci
President of Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana

Iterview with Stefano Ricci - President of the Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana


Presidente Ricci, there’s been a big build up to the 60th anniversary of Firenze Hometown of Fashion. What is the value of this celebration? How do you think it can focus attention on the history and the present of this city?

To mark the 60th anniversary of the founding of the Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana, we wanted to send a strong, clear message about how representative our city is in the world – not just as an art and culture capital, but also in terms of its manufacturing capacity for the textiles and clothing sector. It’s no coincidence that the first fashion shows took place here in the 1950s, and similarly it’s no coincidence that the “Born in Florence” brands developed here; and we have asked them to express their own homage to the city. That’s why we have drawn up an events calendar which is not a retrospective, but rather a message about the future of our labels, the future of Italian creativity, manufacturing, and the extraordinary potential of our homegrown talents. Judging from the attention it has received, especially from international buyers, we believe we’ve achieved our goal. 
 
We are aware of Florence’s role in the history of fashion. But what input can Florence continue to make in the future of Italian fashion?
Let me turn the question around. What is Italian fashion? For someone like me, an Italian product is one that’s “100% made in Italy”. Due to a question of quality, and the implications that this determination has in terms of employment. In this sense, Florence and its surrounding area is a one-off. For example, its great leather goods tradition has driven not just major Italian brands, but also French luxury labels to come and manufacture here. These elements, which perhaps are not particularly “high fashion” but are extremely important if we consider the true quality of the product itself, are celebrated during the Pitti shows. It is then that the various shades of “Italian-ness” are represented, with a noteworthy, qualified foreign presence. The future depends on how dedicated we are in tackling the challenges facing us.  
 
What is the importance of the 60th anniversary of the Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana? What does this milestone mean for the institution?
Our first sixty years stand for the things I have already mentioned. They represent a superb result, considering that the Centro is the oldest institution of its kind at national level. But they also represent a stimulus to do better and better, and do justice to the great past which has allowed Florence to stay in the international spotlight all these years, not least thanks to the crucial work of Pitti Immagine. 
 
In this historic and economic period, what future do you see for Italian fashion and for Tuscan and, more generally, Italian savoir faire?
I see the only possible future there is – namely, a return to our roots. Italian fashion was built up over the years by names who left their mark, such as Roberto Capucci, the first great designers, from Valentino to Armani, right up to a multitude of small businesses who have become successful all over the world. Florence alone, which has a population of 350,000, is home to Gucci, Emilio Pucci, Salvatore Ferragamo, Roberto Cavalli and Ermanno Scervino. That is the merit of Florentine, even more so than Tuscan, savoir faire. 
 
The fashion show at the Uffizi, the installation at the Loggia dei Lanzi, the lighting on the Ponte Vecchio: you and the Stefano Ricci company have made a major, ongoing commitment to support the artistic and historic heritage of Florence and of Italy. How important is it to show support for one’s city? What does supporting Florence mean today? Can fashion be the expression and the means for a new form of patronage? 
I believe that every entrepreneur has a duty to give something back to their region, in whatever way they see fit. Personally, I’ve always tried to draw attention to the various opportunities that have come up. When we celebrate the 40th anniversary of my company, I felt I could contribute to improving the image of Florence with the new lighting for the Loggia dei Lanzi. There have been various such projects over the years. One of them is particularly close to my heart, and this was giving new life and new prospects to the Antico Setificio Fiorentino in 2010; it is part of the heritage of Florence and of the Oltrarno crafts tradition. Although I was asked to, I decided not to show my collection as part of “Firenze Hometown of Fashion” because I didn’t feel it was appropriate, given my role as chairman of the Centro Moda. However, I naturally wanted to pay homage to my city. Hence the new lighting for the Ponte Vecchio, with a water display the likes of which hadn’t been seen for 150 years, thanks to a partnership with Unicredit. So, for me supporting Florence means seeking to improve by at least a millimetre the legacy which has been passed down to us, to make it better in any way we see fit. Fashion as patronage? It’s something that’s taken for granted at international level, and must become so in Italy too. Although there’s always the odd smart Alec who, for the sake of visibility, criticizes those who take action. But I wonder, what have these people ever done, except make comments about others…
 
What made you choose to light up the Ponte Vecchio as a gift to the city and to the people of Florence?
After the Loggia de’ Lanzi, we started talking with the then-mayor Matteo Renzi about how we could continue to help Florence. Meanwhile I decided to restore the ancient volumes on the Arts and Crafts held at the State Archive, as they required conservation work and digitalization for the students of today and tomorrow. Then this opportunity came up. As a symbol, the Ponte Vecchio is one of the strongest in the whole world. I have always been in awe of how, in other countries, even the most anonymous building becomes spectacular if well lit. And here, with our heritage, what do we do? So I would like to thank the authorities for having chosen to assist us in this task.

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Costumes by the Sartoria Tirelli

Over to Dino Trappetti, director of Tirelli Costumi

 

Dino Trappetti was born in Rome and his long career in show business started with a press office in 1965. Since then he has been head of the press office at the Eliseo Theatre in Rome, of the Rossini Opera Festival in Pesaro, of the music weeks in Naples with Salvatore Accardo and has been responsible for organising and launching many cultural and film events, working, as press office, with Luchino Visconti, Mauro Bolognini, Liliana Cavani and Sergio Leone. On behalf of the Ministry for Foreign Affairs, in the eighties he promoted many important Italian Cultural happenings and events abroad (New York, Buenos Aires, Rio de Janeiro…). When Umberto Tirelli died in 1990, he had expressed the desire that Trappetti take over at the helm of Tirelli Costumi, the icon Roman tailors that has made the most famous Oscar-winning theatrical and film costumes.

Following the important donation made by Umberto Tirelli in 1986 to the Costume Gallery in Palazzo Pitti, a collection of some 300 dresses and accessories, Dino Trappetti set up the Tirelli-Trappetti Foundation, with the intention of creating an institution able to preserve the authentic costumes collected by Tirelli and those of historic importance made by the tailors.
 
This is what Dino Trappetti told us about the exhibition that, to coincide with Firenze Hometown of Fashion, will star some of the famous Tirelli costumes, on display in the Foyer of the Opera di Firenze. 
This celebration in Florence of 60 years of Italian Fashion and 50 years of Tirelli Costumi is particularly significant. Together with Beppe Modenese, in 1954 Umberto Tirelli, then both youngsters with great hopes, saw the birth of Italian fashion by the great Giovanni Battista Giorgini in the Sala Bianca in Palazzo Pitti. They decided to work in the field and moved to Milan. One year later, Tirelli got the chance to meet Luchino Visconti in Milan while he was putting on "La Traviata" with Maria Callas at the Teatro alla Scala, and it was Visconti who called him to work in Rome. So this invitation by Pitti Immagine to exhibit in the foyer of the Opera di Firenze, has not come about by chance and I offer my sincere thanks for the opportunity offered to us because it strengthens the link between Tirelli and Florence. This dates back to 1986, with a great donation made by Tirelli to the Costume Gallery in Palazzo Pitti, exhibited with great success in the Silver Museum". 
 

Maria Callas - Traviata

Gown created based on the sketch of Lila De Nobili and renovated by the Sartoria Tirelli under the direction of Tosi.

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ITALIAN AUTOMOTIVE DESIGN FROM THE 50’s AND 60’s

Corrado Lopresto: the architect of dreams on four wheels

 

Corrado Lopresto is one of the most important vintage car collectors in the world. 

A fifty-eight year old from Bagnara Calabra who has lived for many years in Milan, he is a real expert on the subject, revered and admired in Pebble Beach and Amelia Island, Mulhouse and Goodwood. He is the only one who has won four Gold Cups in the Concours d’Elegance at Villa d’Este, something that had not happened since 1929.
In the most exclusive events, his masterpieces always win prizes: mechanical works of art that have earned him 183 international prizes, of which 40 Best in Show.
Unique examples, chassis number ones, or strictly Italian-brand prototypes, on which the greatest car body designers and mechanics from the past experimented futuristic solutions, choices that were the forerunners to the fashion phenomena and style codes for years to come. 
It can quite rightly be said that the Lopresto Collection is a chapter in the history of the car, design, Italy and its creativity. 
In the eighties, when everyone was focusing on classics, I chose the prototypes, those cars that are the maximum expression of flair and genius. I am fascinated by the histories of my cars and the philological work I do to restore them. It is the pleasure of bringing to light things that no-one knows, that drives me to continually look for information, never stopping at what is obvious. I want to find out who designed each of my cars, the names behind the Pininfarina and Bertone “labels”. I win because I know everything about my cars: I follow their restoration and personally do the historic research. The culture we have is without equal and I am incredibly pleased to be able to show the technical level reached by our industry in the past to the rest of the world”.
His love for cars was sparked as a young boy. A “disease” he caught from a cousin: “… When he decided to restore the Aurelia B10 we were driven to school in by a chauffeur. I was 16 and it was my first attempt at restoration. The first car I decided to buy was a 3-gear Balilla. I was twenty years old, I knew very little about it, but I wanted to restore it. I paid 400 thousand lire for it, in instalments with my student’s pocket money. I wrote to Fiat and from Turin they replied that the chassis was a “Luxury” model. With the enthusiasm of youth, I felt like I owned an Isotta Fraschini! 
It took me a year to finish the job, spending most of my time in the workshop of two elderly restorers…

Isotta Fraschini 8A SS Castagna (1930)

Technical details: 
car frame 1651
engine L8 7370 cc 1651
bodywork Castagna 
length x width x height (mt) 5,40; 1,90; 1,85
weight (Kgs) 3000

Alfa Romeo Giulietta Spider Bertone (1955)

Technical Details:
car frame AR1495*0004
engine L4 1290cc AR1315*40182
bodywork Bertone
length/width/height (m) 3,85/1,70/1,20
pace (m) 2,25
weight (kgs) 950 

Alfa Romeo 6C 1750 GS Zagato/Aprile (1931)

Technical Details:

car frame 10814331
engine L6 1752cc 10814331
bodywork Aprile
length/width/height (mts) 4,20/1,70/1,20
pace (m) 2,745
weight (kgs) 980

Alfa Romeo 2500 Sport Stabilimenti Farina (1947)

Technical Dates:

car frame 915339
engine L6 2443cc 926138
bodywork Stabilimenti Farina
lenght./width./height. (m) 4,90/1,80/1,50
pace (m) 3,00
weights (kg) 1800

Lancia Flavia 2000 Sport Zagato (1968)

Technical details:

car frame 820.050*000004
engine V4 1991cc
bodywork Zagato
lenght/width/height (m) 4,20/1,62/1,32
pace (m) 2,40
weights (kgs) 950

Cisitalia 202 (1962)

Technical details:

car frame 034
engine L41089 cc 073
bodywork Pininfarina
Lenght/width/height (mt) 3,40; 1,45; 1,25
pace (mt) 2,40
weight (Kg) 780

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FRANCESCO VEZZOLI PRIMAVERA-ESTATE

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E poi c'è Napoli
directed by Gianluca Migliarotti
produced by Kid Dandy

19.06.2014 | 6.00 pm | Odeon - First screening by invitation only
19.06.2014 | 9.00 pm | Odeon

A project by Firenze Hometown of Fashion

Promoted by
Centro di Firenze per la Moda Italiana e Pitti Immagine
Ministero dello Sviluppo Economico
ITA - Italia Trade Agency

Starring roles:  
Raffaele La Capria, Salvatore Ambrosi, Davide de Blasio - Tramontano, Hugo Jacomet, Maurizio Marinella - E. Marinella, Ciro and Maria Giovanna Paone - Kiton, Gaetano and Annalisa Calabrese - Calabrese dal 1924, Massimiliano and Giuseppe Attolini - Cesare Attolini, Gianluca and Enrico Isaia - Isaia, Mario Portolano and sons, Salvatore Piccolo, Antonio Panico and Gennaro Formosa

 

 

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Tramontano: amidst craftsmanship and innovation

Tramontano is a brand that has made history in the leather goods industry.

Since 1865, the company has been designing and manufacturing bags, cases and leather accessories in Naples according to the city's very best artisan tradition, with renewed use of natural materials and exclusive style that is both simple and elegant. Customers include queens, actresses and representatives of the art and theatre world. 
 

Kiton. The history of a man in love with quality

If this wasn't my job, I'd pay to do it”. Ciro Paone has transformed his greatest passion into a job, raising the concept of tailorship from craft to an art form: a love for beauty and a love for dressing well. The Ciro Paone idea of quality has forged the entire Kiton tailor project right from the start. 

Calabrese: a family tie

In the 1920s, Don Eugenio Calabrese of Naples chose his "tie of the day" personally, every morning. His creativity in imagining fabrics and patterns, together with an entrepreneurial spirit, drove him to establish a tie-making laboratory. Thus the Calabrese Cravatte brand was created. Today, the tailor tradition continues with the 4th generation of Calabrese, with Annalisa Calabrese running the company.

Isaia, a family-run company with an international business model

ISAIA was established in Naples in the 1920s, on an idea of Enrico Isaia who opened a fabrics shop for some of the city's most famous tailors. Thereafter, he established a small laboratory, where skilled artisans made made-to-measure clothing. As new generations took up the reins, ISAIA became a tailoring company producing extremely high-quality items for some of Italy's most prestigious stores. Today, the company numbers more than 200 employees, managed by the family's third generation.

Salvatore Piccolo and the fascination of shirts

Salvatore Piccolo decided to work in a shirt manufacturing company as warehouse operator, as long as it brought him close to the world with which he was so fascinated. The step towards his own shirt workshop was a short one, and a short while later his creations were dressing Naples's best customers, going beyond national boundaries. Today, he tells us that the secret of a good item, in addition to using the very best fabrics and meticulous craftsmanship, is the capacity to listen to his customers. 

Portolano, the magic of a leather glove

The history of the Mario Portolano brand dates back to 1895 with Fortunato, Mario's grandfather, founding a leather glove factory. For more than a century, the Mario Portolano business has been crafting refined gloves, worn by many famous hands, handing down the commitment, experience and masterful manual skills of an ancient tradition with its roots in the Naples artisan culture, from generation to generation. 

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Pitti Immagine and Sky Arte HD present
LE ITALIE DELLA MODA
curated by Angelo Flaccavento

I have been commissioned to develop Le Italie della Moda, by Pitti Immagine on behalf of the Centro di Firenze per la Moda, the Florence Fashion Centre. This project is the outcome of a desire to give Italian fashion, seen as the overall system that expresses an unrepeatable and inimitable culture of doing, a dignity on television that it has, perhaps, not so far enjoyed. The choice of the Sky Arte HD channel moves in this direction: this focuses on a visual and narrative approach at the highest levels, in an attempt to reproduce a wide-ranging, detailed picture in a softer framework. In nine themed episodes, it will range from family businesses, the cornerstone of Italian enterprise, to regeneration of the current fashion scene, via case histories of captains of enterprise, exploration into the fascinating world of fabrics and material and tales of business teamed with creativity. It will also include a whole episode dedicated to Florence, a feather in the cap of fashion, bringing together, without any kind of pecking order, famous big names and small visionary outsiders. No attempt to be exhaustive or an encyclopaedia: Le Italie della Moda is an open format, which for the moment focuses on a series of key stories, examples of a much wider macro-cosmos that could be further investigated in the future. The point of view is particular and characteristic: a backstage look at Italian fashion, emphasising the process over the product, manual and artisan skills over the immaterialness of communication, facts over words. What we wanted to describe, through stories told by the players in person, is the complexity of making fashion, namely the hard work that lies behind the beauty renewed every six months: work that calls for passion and boldness, that teams imagination and calculation, combining tradition and innovation. We will see ateliers and workshops, we will hear sewing machines and hands at work, but all the glitter and partying will be left off screen, deliberately. In order to appreciate the uniqueness of Made in Italy, in my opinion, all you need to do is listen to the tales of those who make it: it is an excellence that says it all, but that had never before been seen from so close up. The uniqueness of this series is the result of a combination of a journalistic style viewpoint, mine, with the winning narrative skills of the television writer, Donato Dallavalle, and the taste for an evocative, persistent image of the director Francesco Imperato. All this plus the Sky Arte imprint. Le Italie della Moda is a group effort, because fashion is a group effort too. In imagining its urgency, Pitti Immagine once again confirms its long-standing farsightedness. 


Angelo Flaccavento

Roberto Pisoni
Director of Sky Arte HD

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au jour le jour

Back to memories: a journey into the life and work of Mirko Fontana and Diego Marquez aka Au Jour Le Jour, who will present for the first time at Pitti Uomo 86 on the occasion of Firenze Hometown of Fashion their men's line. After being finalists at  Who is On Next? 2011, their career is marked by a crescendo of success, thanks to an ironic  and playful fashion. Their print mania achieved huge success among press and buyers. In this video interview, the fashion duo unveil themselves between school memories and moments of personal and professional life, that open  up a window on their creativity

Mirko Fontana e Diego Marquez

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Translating Florentine excellence into a contemporary language: interview with Ermanno Scervino

 

Can you tell us about the Ermanno Scervino tribute to Florence set to coincide with Firenze Hometown of Fashion?
I decided to celebrate the excellence of my home town with an evening in the marvellous setting of Forte Belvedere.

 
What does "Born in Florence" mean for a fashion house like Ermanno Scervino? And on an international level?
My close ties with Tuscany have always been one of the intrinsic values of my fashion house. The combination of tradition, tailoring and technical skills represents what “Made in Italy” really means, which has always been a guarantee of quality and is envied worldwide. I like to translate the excellence of Florentine production into a modern language, combining glamour with tailoring traditions, and with the most innovative workmanship and research.
 
Do you think that the cultural and economic fabric of Florence and Tuscany may have influenced your approach to fashion?
Yes, definitely. It was our idea, right from the outset, to produce exclusively in Italy, by taking over some traditional and longstanding workshops that risked closure. We merged them into one single entity, creating our headquarters at the gates of Florence. We have always promoted the protection of Italian and particularly Florentine savoir faire, which is something that has been rewarded in all international markets.
 
Your creations are marked by the continuous interplay of influences, between the past, present and future. How important is it to be able to pass down and reinterpret past traditions to create innovative fashion? Innovation and tradition go hand in hand. I adore experimentation and I am not sentimental about the past. As I said, my goal is to reinterpret traditional values using a modern language, and safeguarding their excellence.
 
Florence is ....?
My home. After much travelling I decided to settle here, because I wanted my brand to have strong ties with this city. Every corner of Florence tells something about the history of my country and of Italian culture.